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Cinnabar Chanterelle
Cantharellus cinnabarinus

This page is NOT to be used for identification for eating!

I didn’t know chanterelles came in this color until I found one and identified it! They are bright reddish/orange i.e. “cinnabar red” and aren’t that big. Some of the ones I found were the size of a nickel. To make a meal, you’d need a lot (or look for other chantrelles and mix them together, which I have done for a nice wild fungi risotto).

Chanterelle’s in general have some cool health benefits. They contains about 1-2mg of iron. They also contains copper, a highly essential mineral, and are rich in Vitamin D and fiber. They also taste wonderful!

Size: 1.2 - 4 cm across 
Family: Cantharellaceae 
Habitat: Several to many on ground near hardwoods. I've found them under hemlock, however, which makes sense since they show a preference for acidic soils.
Identifiers: Bright cinnabar red color growing on the forest floor, flesh is white. Like other chanterelles, has false gills underneath the cap. The spore print is bright pink, odor mild. Fruits in summer and fall.
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